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Amy Tsui, Ph.D., MA

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William Nelson, MD

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This week's topics include SSRIs and infant risk, fructose and the brain, BMI and mortality, and transfusion in gastrointestinal bleeding.

Program Notes

Related Article: Obesity and Mortality

 

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Dr. Jon Weingart explains how the use of the iMRI technology and brain navigation can lead to better surgical outcomes.

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ANCHOR LEAD: INTENSIVE MANAGEMENT DOESN’T HELP AVOID CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS IN THOSE WITH DIABETES, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

People with diabetes are at increased risk for heart attack, stroke, and other adverse outcomes.  A large NIH sponsored study begun over a decade ago aimed to determine if intensive management of risk factors could reduce their incidence.  Rita Kalyani, a diabetes expert at Johns Hopkins, describes the results.

KALYANI: This study was designed to test the hypothesis that an intensive intervention could affect cardiovascular risk factors and ultimately reduce cardiovascular events.  In this interim analysis patients had been followed for up to 11 years and what they found was that although previous analyses done at shorter intervals demonstrated benefits on sleep patterns, on need for medications, in those who were in the intensive arm.  After this duration of follow up, which was up to 11 years, there was no significantly decreased risk of cardiovascular events, and this was a surprising finding.    :33

Kalyani says that those in the intensive management group did need fewer medications, however.  At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

 

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ANCHOR LEAD: HOW MUCH CAN BEANS HELP KEEP BLOOD SUGAR UNDER CONTROL FOR THOSE WITH DIABETES?  ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

If you really like legumes like beans and lentils, they may help keep your blood sugar under control if you have diabetes, but are not so good that people should strive to make a switch to them from whole grains.  That’s the conclusion of a new study, and Rita Kalyani, a diabetes expert at Johns Hopkins, says the diet and diabetes relationship is complex.

KALYANI: Low glycemic foods can certainly be a part of that but they are not the only part of that.  So it’s important to have a balanced diet of carbohydrates, proteins and fat.  We say to moderate carbohydrates, not restrict them because it is important to have it for energy and metabolism.  Also saturated versus trans fat is also important to keep those in mind. Having a healthy intake of fiber, moderating alcohol consumption, moderating sugarYsweetened beverage consumption, all of these factors go into a healthy diet. :28

Kalyani adds that factors such as exercise must also be considered for blood sugar control. At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

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Program notes:
0:16 The population needing joint surgery has grown exponentially
1:01 Now we have good research showing that earlier is better
2:08 They need to meet some criteria to be a candidate
3:12 Many patients want both knees done at the same time
4:12 Our length of stay has really improved dramatically
5:04 We've improved techniques, less tissue damage, faster range of motion recovery
6:05 Do through three to five inch incisions, sneak in through the side
7:01 Hip resurfacing saves bone
8:02 May or may not need conversion to a total replacement later
9:02 We will take away their pain, give them their life back
9:56 End

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