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Anchor lead: Infants don’t need fruit juice, Elizabeth Tracey reports

Infants shouldn’t be given fruit juice, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended recently. Laura Davis, a pediatric nutrition expert at Johns Hopkins, applauds the decision.

Davis: I’m kind of surprised that it took this long for them to get here. But really happy about this change. The nutrients that are provided in fruit juice are not something that, especially in our country is something that we’re low on, and the vitamin C that a child would get from juice is adequate in breast milk, or in formulas if breast milk is not available. So it doesn’t really provide anything extra to the diet and actually just displaces the actual nutrients that the child really truly needs to grow and develop.  :30

Davis says many adults have the mistaken perception that fruit juice is a nutritious choice, winning hands down over soft drinks, but when the two are compared, that’s not really the case, since when fruit is squeezed into juice what remains are sugars and water, with fruit flavoring and color. Davis advocates breast milk or formula for infants, and water for older children. At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

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Anchor lead: Does it matter if men and women process meditation differently? Elizabeth Tracey reports

College aged women were able to reduce so-called negative affect – things like anxiety and depression -more with meditation than college men were, a recent study found. Meera Goyal, an internal medicine expert and meditation researcher at Johns Hopkins, says his own survey of the research on meditation did not discern such a difference.

Goyal: These studies did not really differentiate between men and women I think we were seeing effects across the board. I think we can say that there is pretty good evidence that mindfulness programs reduce symptoms of anxiety, depression and pain, which are ubiquitous in society and in any clinical population. There’s certainly a lot more research that needs to be done but we have pretty good evidence I think to comfortably recommend this as a therapy or as an adjunct to therapy for most people. :30

Goyal notes that meditation is simple to learn and has a low risk of harm, so it’s well worth beginning a practice. At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

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Anchor lead: Do men and women respond to meditation differently? Elizabeth Tracey reports

The practice of mediation has different effects on college aged men and women, a recent study concluded, with women seeming to improve more in things like anxiety and depression after learning and practicing the skill.  Meera Goyal, an internal medicine expert at Johns Hopkins and meditation researcher, says the jury is still out.

Goyal: Women tended to improve in negative affect more so than the men did. I think that it’s a fairly preliminary study. I wouldn’t take this as bona fide evidence that men and women definitely process these meditation skills differently. But I think it raises the possibility that men and women may process these skills that they learn in meditation on how to deal with certain emotions they may process these somewhat differently.   :29

Goyal says his own research demonstrates benefits for all, so he encourages the practice universally. At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

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Anchor lead: Should kids in foster care get all the vaccines they are eligible for? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Foster children in Texas may not be able to get the full range of vaccines for which they are eligible, the state legislature decided recently, with the HPV vaccine in particular a target. Connie Trimble, an HPV and cervical cancer expert at Johns Hopkins, says such a choice is indefensible.

Trimble:  We are the first generation fortunate enough, maybe we’re the second, but we grow up expecting to know our grandparents. That’s because of three basic public health advances: running water, antibiotics, and vaccines. The idea that somebody could prevent a child from being protected against diseases that could kill them and also infect people with whom they interact who are vulnerable because they themselves can’t be vaccinated. It doesn’t just stop with the kid.   :30

Proponents of the legislation are citing parental rights as the reason to withhold vaccination for children in the foster care system until dispensation for the child is decided. Trimble notes that for many, such a posture is tantamount to assuring that no vaccines will be given. At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

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Senior man communicating with a male doctor in the office.

This week’s topics include patient monitoring of cancer symptoms and survival, negative impact of alcohol consumption, lymph node dissection in melanoma, and significance of small aneurysms in brain.

0:32 Patient monitoring of cancer symptoms and survival
1:34 Reported to nurse
2:39 Advanced melanoma and lymph node dissection
3:35 Half had dissection and survival observed
4:46 What do sentinel nodes really tell us?
5:06 Small aneurysms in the brain
6:06 Less than 3mm zero percent ruptured
7:07 High blood pressure not considered high risk
7:43 The negative impact of alcohol consumption
8:43 Region specific atrophy
10:01 End

Related blog: https://podblog.blogs.hopkinsmedicine.org/2017/06/12/paying-attention-to-cancer-symptoms/

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HepatitisThis week’s topics include treating resistant hepatitis C infection, a new regimen for breast cancer, evolution of non-small cell lung cancer, and minocycline for MS.
Program notes:
0:44 Evolution of lung cancer
1:42 Did genetic analysis of whole tumor
2:42 Insight into how to target therapy
3:13 Bad actor breast cancers
4:16 Disease free survival better
4:42 Minocycline for MS
5:43 Which progressed on drug
6:43 Identify who would respond
7:05 Treatment resistant hepatitis C
8:04 Sustained virologic response
9:03 No geographic difference
10:15 End
Related blog:
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Anchor lead: Cooling the body is recommended for some after a heart attack, but why? Elizabeth Tracey reports

 

If you have a loved one who’s had a heart attack, should you ask whether they would benefit from cooling their body, as recommended by the American Academy of Neurology recently? Michael Blaha, a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins, comments.

Blaha:I think it is worth family members who have a family member who’s had an out of hospital arrest to be aware of what the heart rhythm was and whether a shock was delivered in the field, and then to ask their doctors about whether cooling is right for their family member.  :13

Blaha says cooling works to prevent additional injury by a simple mechanism.

Blaha: It’s kind of like my fish in my fish pond. When they’re cooled they kind of nothing happens, their metabolism shuts down and then it warms up and all of a sudden they start swimming again. So you want to just slow the body’s metabolism down to the point where there’s not a whole lot going on so there’s less injury.   :14

Blaha notes that cooling also reduces the likelihood of fever, a common aftereffect of a heart attack. At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

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