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This week’s topics include vitamin E and Alzheimer’s, driving distracted, mammography statistics, and global effects of smoking.

Program Notes

 Related Article: Vitamin E Redux

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ANCHOR LEAD: THE LATEST VACCINE FOR HIV DIDN’T WORK BUT STILL ADVANCES EFFORTS, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

The latest vaccine candidate to prevent infection with HIV hasn’t helped, a study published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine reported. Mike Klag, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, says that valuable information was gleaned from the trial, however.
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ANCHOR LEAD: IF YOU’RE A SMOKER OR FORMER SMOKER, SHOULD YOU BE SCREENED FOR LUNG CANCER? ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Overdiagnosis is the new buzzword in many cancer circles, indicating the detection of a cancer that would never have been life-threatening but now requires further evaluation and possible treatment, with a recent study applying this term to the use of low-dose CT to screen people with a long term history of smoking for lung cancer. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, offers his take on this screening.
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ANCHOR LEAD: HOW WILL A NEW TYPE OF HEART DEFIBRILLATOR CHANGE TREATMENT? ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

A new type of heart defibrillator, a device that shocks the heart into beating in concert again when it falls out of rhythm, is being used in a very few centers nationally, Johns Hopkins among them. Alan Cheng, a specialist in the heart’s electrical system who is using the device at Hopkins, says he’s not sure how much this new type will come to dominant the market.
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ANCHOR LEAD: A NEW WAY OF TREATING A COMMON HEART PROBLEM IS NOW AVAILABLE, ELIZABETH
TRACEY REPORTS

Arrhythmias, where the heart fails to beat in a coordinated way, are very common. The dangerous ones can be managed with devices that shock the heart into coordinated beating known as ICDs. Now a new type of ICD is being used at Johns Hopkins and a few other centers. Alan Cheng, an expert in the heart’s electrical system who’s using the new device at Hopkins, describes how it works. [click to continue…]

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ANCHOR LEAD: JUST HOW EFFECTIVE ARE VACCINES AT PREVENTING DISEASE? ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Vaccines are responsible for reducing the number of cases of infectious disease by over 100 million since their use became widespread, a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine found. The study looked at eight reportable diseases before and after implementation of immunization and calculated
this number, which many experts think is an underestimate. Redonda Miller, an internal medicine
expert at Johns Hopkins, offers her opinion.

MILLER: The message I take away is vaccination works, it’s that simple. Unfortunately we get caught up in the day to day in our physician’s offices, our patients do the same, looking at well no one I know has had measles for the last 10 years, if you look back, we’re talking the last century, and look at these numbers, it is impressive and I think adds great impact to our vaccination programs :24

Urban myths have recently caused more parents to avoid vaccinations, and many serious infections are coming back, data shows. At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

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This week’s topics include nuts in pregnancy, meniscal tears, testing for BRCA mutations, and dangers of supplements to your liver.

Program Notes

Related Article: Meniscus Repair?

 

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