Play

People who were obese who had bariatric surgery developed about half the number of cancers ten years later than did obese people who didn’t have the surgery, a recent study found. Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson at Johns Hopkins …

Should you have bariatric surgery to reduce your risk for cancer? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

Play

Obesity is known to increase cancer risk, so if someone who is very overweight has bariatric surgery, does their risk for cancer decline? Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson at Johns Hopkins describes a new study that examines this question. …

If you have bariatric surgery do you decrease your risk for cancer? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

Play

Surgery is sometimes the only treatment needed for colorectal cancer, while at other times additional chemotherapy is also required. Now a new study shows that a blood test looking for cancer DNA can help identify the one in five people …

Can a blood test be used to see if chemotherapy is needed for colorectal cancer? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

Play

A genetic form of colorectal cancer responds to treatment with a type of cancer drug known as an immune checkpoint inhibitor extremely well, a new study reveals. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, reviews the …

A new treatment seems to help 100% of people with a type of colorectal cancer, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

Play

Chemical groups called methyl groups can be removed from DNA by certain drugs used to treat cancer, but now a new study raises the possibility that in some people, such treatments unleash genes known to worsen cancer. William Nelson, director …

Can removing chemical groups from DNA make cancer worse? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

Play

As Covid has ground on, many people avoided routine medical care, including cancer screenings. Needa Zaidi, an oncologist at Johns Hopkins, says that’s understandable, but if you notice anything unusual going on, it may be time to seek care. Zaidi: …

If you’ve put off cancer screening during the pandemic, what might be of concern? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

Play

Heart disease remains the number one cause of death worldwide, but cancer is coming up quickly. Needa Zaidi, an oncologist at Johns Hopkins, says the data point to much better outcomes even though more people are developing cancer. Zaidi: The …

Even as more people are developing cancer worldwide, survival is also going up, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »