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Disasters have been happening for a long time now, and so have studies of them. Karen Swartz, a psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins, reminds us that we can view our current predicament through the lens of history, and perhaps regain some …

People’s responses to disasters help predict their response to the pandemic, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

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Some people quip that change is the only constant in life, and that’s demonstrably true about Covid-19 and the pandemic. Karen Swartz, a psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins, says that very quality is one of the greatest challenges for most of …

One thing that makes the pandemic so challenging is how rapidly it changes, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

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If you’re one of the vast number of people who are experiencing mental illness, a new book by Johns Hopkins psychiatrist Meg Chisolm may help. The title of the book is “From Survive to Thrive, Living Your Best Life With …

A concept known as ‘flourishing’ is changing how mental illness is managed, Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

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Mental health problems have spiked during the Covid-19 pandemic, and a new book by Johns Hopkins psychiatrist Meg Chisolm may help. Called “From Survive to Thrive, Living Your Best Life With Mental Illness,” the book aims to go beyond simply …

How does the concept of flourishing define current mental health practice? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

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Imagine you have moderate to severe depression. Would you stop taking your medicines to be part of a research study comparing psilocybin to a traditional antidepressant? That was a requirement for participants in a recently reported study, and Matthew Johnson, …

What was required to be part of a recent research study on depression? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

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Psilocybin compared favorably with a traditional antidepressant for treating moderate to severe depression, a recent study found. Matthew Johnson, a psychedelics researcher at Johns Hopkins, says an entirely different clinical approach will be required to use psilocybin routinely for depression. …

What is needed clinically to use psilocybin to treat depression? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »

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For people with depression, sometimes traditional antidepressant medicines simply don’t work. Now psychedelic medicines may be a new choice, if the results of a study comparing psilocybin to escitalopram, an antidepressant, hold up. Matthew Johnson, a psychedelics researcher at Johns …

Could psychedelic medicines replace antidepressants? Elizabeth Tracey reports Read more »